• The De Havilland Mosquito

    What a great day, having a good look at my favourite Aircraft The De Havilland Mosquito, at the Yorkshire Air Museum.

    Posted by Mark Fowler
  • The De Havilland Mosquito

    The first war plane made by the de Havilland Company since the last war. It is of wood construction, the fuselage being made in two halves, longitudinally.

    De Havilland Mosquito Mark Fowler Mosquito
    It first flew at the end of 1941 and was first made known to the public after the successful raid by four of them on September 25th, 1942, on the Gestapo H.Q. in Oslo. When over Oslo with their bomb doors open, they were attacked by two F.W.190s which happened to be in the air when they arrived. One was shot down, but the others, with their bomb doors now closed, outpaced the F.W.190s, who gave up the chase 60 miles out to sea.

    They had been used before this date to take “after bombing” photographs and on reconnaissance trips over Germany. Were used recently in a raid on the Phillips Radio Factory in Holland, and are constantly over the occupied countries and Germany.

    Posted by Mark Fowler
  • The Mosquito High Speed Bombers

    From mid-1942 to mid-1943, Mosquito bombers flew high-speed, medium or low-altitude missions against factories, railways and other pinpoint targets in Germany and German-occupied Europe. From late 1943, Mosquito bombers were formed into the Light Night Strike Force and used as pathfinders for RAF Bomber Commands heavy-bomber raids.

    Posted by Mark Fowler
  • The De Havilland Mosquito

    The first war plane made by the de Havilland Company since the last war. It is of wood construction, the fuselage being made in two halves, longitudinally.

    MosquitoIt first flew at the end of 1941 and was first made known to the public after the successful raid by four of them on September 25th, 1942, on the Gestapo H.Q. in Oslo. When over Oslo with their bomb doors open, they were attacked by two F.W.190s which happened to be in the air when they arrived. One was shot down, but the others, with their bomb doors now closed, outpaced the F.W.190s, who gave up the chase 60 miles out to sea.

    They had been used before this date to take “after bombing” photographs and on reconnaissance trips over Germany. Were used recently in a raid on the Phillips Radio Factory in Holland, and are constantly over the occupied countries and Germany.

    Posted by Mark Fowler
  • The De Havilland Mosquito Banff Strike Wing

    The Banff Strike Wing enjoyed spectacular successes during its time on the coast of the Moray Firth. Its squadrons joined forces to create an effective multi-national unit. Combined, they denied Germany many thousands of tons of vital iron ore and other supplies during operations from RAF Banff between September 1944 and May 1945. The mixed Mosquito and Beaufighter Wing mounted concentrated attacks on German surface vessels and U-boats in the North Sea and along the Norwegian coastline. Penetrating deep into heavily defended Norwegian fjords to reach their anchored supply ship targets, the crews ran the gauntlet of formidable anti-aircraft fire to achieve their goal. The unit was unique because of the presence of 333 Sqn Royal Norwegian Air Force as part of the Strike Wing. Their aerial skills and their ability to locate targets hidden in mountain-fringed fjords became one of the RAF Banff Wing's great strengths. It helped the joint RAF, Norwegian and Commonwealth aircrews of the unit achieve outstanding success in the destruction of supply ships, flak ships and U-boats. Operational Flying..Dirty Aircraft.

    Posted by Mark Fowler