• The De Havilland Mosquito

    The first war plane made by the de Havilland Company since the last war. It is of wood construction, the fuselage being made in two halves, longitudinally.

    De Havilland Mosquito Mark Fowler Mosquito
    It first flew at the end of 1941 and was first made known to the public after the successful raid by four of them on September 25th, 1942, on the Gestapo H.Q. in Oslo. When over Oslo with their bomb doors open, they were attacked by two F.W.190s which happened to be in the air when they arrived. One was shot down, but the others, with their bomb doors now closed, outpaced the F.W.190s, who gave up the chase 60 miles out to sea.

    They had been used before this date to take “after bombing” photographs and on reconnaissance trips over Germany. Were used recently in a raid on the Phillips Radio Factory in Holland, and are constantly over the occupied countries and Germany.

    Posted by Mark Fowler
  • The De Havilland Mosquito Bomb Bay and Cannons

    The De Havilland DH.98 Mosquito is one of my favourite aircraft this picture shows the The Business end of the aircraft, the Cannons and Bomb Bay.The Aircraft was revolutionary, designed and made mainly of wood with the 2 Rolls Royce Merlins Engines, the power to weight ratio was incredible, hence the high speed.  As a comparison the Modern Day  Hawk and Tornado operate at 420 Knots, that's 7 miles a minute, the Mosquito was achieving these speeds in the 1940's during world War II. 

    Posted by Mark Fowler
  • The De Havilland Mosquito Series View form the back.

    The De Havilland DH.98 Mosquito is one of my favourite aircraft this picture shows the view from the back of the Aircraft.  The Aircraft was revolutionary, designed and made mainly of wood with the 2 Rolls Royce Merlins Engines, the power to weight ratio was incredible, hence the high speed.  As a comparison the Modern Day  Hawk and Tornado operate at 420 Knots, that's 7 miles a minute, the Mosquito was achieving these speeds in the 1940's during world War II. 

    Posted by Mark Fowler